HARVARD SQUARE COMMENTARY

January 28, 2008
From Sanitas

A Lexicon for the 21st Century

John Turner


Discourse: Academic palaver made in the interest of getting tenure, the only form of heaven imaginable in the world of scholarship.

Discretion: Recognizing that the things people tear their hair over are generally not worth the loss of a single strand.

Disease: The first stage of the ultimate equality.

Disgrace: Harping on the peccadilloes of others in order to turn attention away from one's own shabby acts.

Dish: What an elderly survivor of the Titanic was at the time of collision.

Dishonor: Character trait exhibited most perfectly by university administrators in search of money.

Disorder: A weakness elevated to a disease so that people who can't cure it can get paid for trying.

Disposition: The source of all happiness and of a considerable portion of misery, though exactly what portion we don't have a calculus fine enough to figure.

Dissociative: Term applied to counterfeit mental problems which once went under other names but which became so blatantly improbable that not even psychologists could believe in them anymore.

Distinction: A thing prized in oneself which is thought by others to be merely peculiar.

Distinguished: Character of a donor to an institution which thinks exceedingly well of itself.

Distortion: The relationship between the significance of an event and the amount of attention the press gives it.


............................................................................................................................................................................


Comment On This Article
(Please include your name so that we may publish your remarks.)


Return to the Table of Contents



Home           Contact Us           Mailing List           Archives           Books on Sale            Links



Articles may be quoted or republished in full with attribution
to the author and harvardsquarecommentary.org.



This site is designed and managed by Neil Turner at Neil Turner Concepts